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Group photo from March of Dimes

Approximately 13,000 babies in Pennsylvania will be born prematurely this year—and Columbia Gas of Pennsylvania wants to help March of Dimes lead the fight for the health of all moms and babies. Through advocacy, education and research March of Dimes is working to level the playing field so that every mom and baby get the best possible start.

Mike Davidson, Vice President and General Manager at Columbia Gas, understands first-hand the importance of improving the health of all moms and babies. “All of our fundraising was among fellow co-workers. 100% of funds raised were donated by Columbia Gas employees. Employees organized a pasta lunch fundraiser, a chili and dessert bake-off, dime wars, a pot luck and skills based competitions as a creative, fun way to raise money for a great cause."

Columbia Gas employees and families are honored to advance the mission of the March of Dimes,” said Columbia Gas Community Engagement Manager, Sarah Perry. “The March for Babies event gives everyone in our community the chance to make a difference in the lives of millions of babies.”

We’re grateful and excited to have Columbia Gas participating in March for Babies,” says Benjamin Chaffee, Senior Development Manager with March of Dimes. “The passion and commitment of Columbia Gas employees will be a tremendous factor driving the success of the events and supporting the health of moms and babies here and across the country.”

Columbia Gas is committed to giving back to organizations like March of Dimes who are working to make a positive difference in the communities where we live and deliver natural gas. For more information about Columbia Gas of Pennsylvania’s focus on community support, visit www.ColumbiaGasPA.com/givingback.

March of Dimes gives more than 4 million babies born each year the best possible start. Nearly half a million of them are born prematurely or with birth defects. Premature birth and its complications are the largest contributors to infant death in the U.S. and pregnancy-related death has more than doubled over the past 25 years.

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